11 Brilliant Books For 11+ Boys Who Hate Reading

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Happy bank holiday weekend!

I hope you’re having a wonderful Monday and are enjoying the warm weather.

As we prepare for our 11+ summer course, I am inundated with messages and calls from parents asking for tips on how to help their sons with reading. 

Generally, it seems that reading is the domain of girls and I’m always amazed by how much my female students tend to love reading whilst the majority of my male students hate it. There are so many potential reasons for this but if I start on them, I’ll be writing forever.  

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As a proud bookworm, I’m constantly looking for the best books and stories for children aged 8-12 and always become incredibly excited when I stumble across a great undiscovered book. It’s like finding a hidden gem.

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If you have a son who absolutely hates reading, then hopefully this quick list of 11 of my favourite reading books will be helpful. It’s not a definitive list but it should act as a starting point and hopefully inspire you and your son to keep hunting for more great stories.

Without further ado, here we go:

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  1. Storm Breaker by Anthony Horowitz 

  2. HIVE by Mark Walden 

  3. The Hunger Games Trilogy by Suzanne Collins (this trilogy is especially great for helping children to come up with clever ideas for cliffhangers, inspire their creative thinking skills and improve their story writing structure. I’m a huge fan!)

  4. Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer

  5. Shadow jumper by JM Forster

  6. The Maze Runner by James Dashner 

  7. Thieves Like Us by Stephen Cole

  8. Evil Genius by Catherine Jinks

  9. Traitor Series, Andy McNab

  10. The Door or No Return by Sarah Mussi

  11. Sure Fire by Jack Higgins

There are a few other great finds such as The Cherub Series by Robert Muchamore.

Has your child read any of the above books? Which was their favourite? Are there any other great books that you love?

Let us know by leaving a comment below.

 

How To Help Your Child Improve Their Comprehension Skills (Audio)

Happy Sunday!

I’ve been thinking about recoding audios instead of written blog posts for a long time and finally had the chance to record one today.

In this audio, I discuss:

  • The tactics that parents can use to help their child engage with literature and improve their comprehension skills.

  • Strategies that students can use to improve their comprehension skills and score higher marks.

If your child struggles with comprehension (especially inference, elaboration and deduction) then this is for you.

Here’s a summary of some of the tips I share:

  • Be involved in your child’s learning, especially with regards to their reading. Let them read to you as often as possible.

  • Read in short bursts rather than forcing your child to read for long periods. It’s better to read little and often than not at all.

  • Read a wide variety of texts including poetry, biographies, newspapers and age-appropriate magazines/comics.

  • Incorporate your child’s passions, interests and hobbies into their reading - make it fun.

  • Be strategic about approaching exam questions so that your child can maximise their scores (I talk about this in a bit of depth so it’s worth listening to hear the tips shared).

I hope the audio is useful and if you have any questions or comments, please click on the comment box below and share them.

Here’s to your child’s success!

Victoria, The Tutoress.

How To Be Tactical About The 11+, 13+ & Other School Entrance Exams

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It’s that time of year when our students find out whether they’ve passed the 11+ and it’s naturally a very nerve-wrecking time for them.

I recently spoke to a parent and was asking how her child did and the conversation reminded me of the fact the importance of strategic thinking when it comes to the 11+

admissions process. For instance, one mum insisted that she would only apply for just one school. The school just so happened to be one of the most competitive schools in the UK and is exceptionally selective. I suggested that she consider other options but the mum was adamant that she only needed to apply for that particular school.  Although I respect her decision, I do believe that it’s important to consider multiple schools.

When it comes to the 11+ (or any school entrance exam) it’s best not to put all your eggs in one basket. 

I always advise clients to apply for a variety of schools as it gives their child not just a higher chance of acceptance but more choice. 

Choice is a beautiful thing because it enables you and your child to pick the school that is most likely to be the best fit for them.

In contrast, if you only apply for one school, your child has a lower chance of being accepted and if accepted, they might soon discover that they don’t like the school. This results in limited options and potential unhappiness.

Applying for several schools is a smart tactic and I recommend sharp thinking when it comes to the 11+ and 13+ application process.

I’ll be sharing some more tactic tips over the next few blog posts but I hope this has encouraged you to think in a more strategic way.

Here’s to your child success!

The Tutoress Team. 

Why Your Child Needs a Reading Nook and How To Create One Without Breaking The Bank

A reading nook, what’s that?  

Thats exactly what I asked myself when I first saw the phrase splattered over several mum blogs. 

Nonetheless, I soon found myself entranced by an array of books, posters, paintings and bean bags, all of which brought back beautiful memories of childhood. 

There’s something about reading that is so magical and transformative, especially for children and it’s those memories of reading a beloved book that stay with a child for a lifetime.

Reading is magical.

If you’re wondering what a reading nook is, it’s simply a small reading corner or area within your home that’s dedicated to reading. It’s like a little haven where your child can go to escape from the hussle

and bustle of school and delve into any book of their choosing. 

 

The reason why it’s so beneficial to have one is because it enables your child to allocate time and space to reading; it separates reading time and helps them to prioritise it. 

Furthermore, your child can read to themselves, with a sibling or you can join in and read with them.  

Plus, reading nooks/corners are pretty and inspiring which means that children naturally gravitate towards them. They make reading fun. 

And by the way, it doesn’t need to cost a fortune to make one. I recently used a windowsill as a reading corner space in my house and it looks beautiful. I literally can’t stop staring at it.  

Here are some of our favourites for your inspiration.

 

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A reading corner with a beautiful decal quote. 

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A beautiful pink reading corner.

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A window-based reading corner that’s bright and colourful. 

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A collage of some of our favourite reading books. 

 

This week, think of some ways in which you can create a reading corner in your home. It’s the perfect excuse for a trip to IKEA 🙂.

Why Your Child Needs a Reading Nook and How To Create One (Without Breaking The Bank)

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A reading nook, what’s that?  

Thats exactly what I asked myself when I first saw the phrase splattered over several mum blogs. 

Nonetheless, I soon found myself entranced by an array of books, posters, paintings and bean bags, all of which brought back beautiful memories of childhood. 

There’s something about reading that is so magical and transformative, especially for children and it’s those memories of reading a beloved book that stay with a child for a lifetime.

Reading is magical.

If you’re wondering what a reading nook is, it’s simply a small reading corner or area within your home that’s dedicated to reading. It’s like a little haven where your child can go to escape from the hussle

and bustle of school and delve into any book of their choosing. 

 

The reason why it’s so beneficial to have one is because it enables your child to allocate time and space to reading; it separates reading time and helps them to prioritise it. 

Furthermore, your child can read to themselves, with a sibling or you can join in and read with them.  

Plus, reading nooks/corners are pretty and inspiring which means that children naturally gravitate towards them. They make reading fun. 

And by the way, it doesn’t need to cost a fortune to make one. I recently used a windowsill as a reading corner space in my house and it looks beautiful. I literally can’t stop staring at it.  

Here are some of our favourites for your inspiration.

 

FullSizeRender.jpg

A reading corner with a beautiful decal quote. 

FullSizeRender.jpg

A beautiful pink reading corner.

FullSizeRender.jpg

A window-based reading corner that’s bright and colourful. 

IMG_2921.JPG

A collage of some of our favourite reading books. 

 

This week, think of some ways in which you can create a reading corner in your home. It’s the perfect excuse for a trip to IKEA 🙂.